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Figures


Figure 2.1: Model of a non-manifold domain.


Figure 2.2: Rational Bezier entities: a) a curve, b) a surface.


Figure 2.3: Curve expansion.


Figure 2.4: Curve splitting.


Figure 2.5: Surface splitting.


Figure 2.6: Curve extraction from a curve.


Figure 2.7: Surface extraction from a surface.


Figure 2.8: Curve extraction from a surface.


Figure 2.9: Octree hierarchy (2D case).


Figure 2.10: Enforcement of the octree one-level difference (2D case).


Figure 2.11: Octree built around a mechanical part and corresponding mesh size contours (2D case).


Figure 2.12: Octree built around a double bended curve (2D case).


Figure 2.13: Discretization of a curve.


Figure 2.14: Location of the ``ideal'' point to form a new triangle.


Figure 2.15: Projection of point to a surface.


Figure 2.16: Correction of the ``ideal'' point due to the surface curvature.


Figure 2.17: Correction of the ``ideal'' element size due to the mesh size gradation.


Figure 2.18: Neighbourhood of point (2D case).


Figure 2.19: Selection of point (2D case).


Figure 2.20: Uniform mesh of a circle with (a) and without (b) application of the ellipsoidal neighbourhood .


Figure 2.21: Intersection check on a poorly parameterized surface.


Figure 2.22: Diagonal edge swapping.


Figure 2.23: Front propagation and diagonal edge swapping (2D case).


Figure 2.24: Location of the ``ideal'' point to form a new tetrahedron.


Figure 2.25: Sphere circumscribed to a tetrahedron.


Figure 2.26: Topological transformations: a) 3 to 2, b) 4 to 4.


Figure 2.27: A topologically compatible curve mesh (a), topological hole (b), and topological redundancy (c) on a curve mesh.


Figure 2.28: A topologically compatible surface mesh (a), topological hole (b), and topological redundancy (c) on a surface mesh.


Figure 2.29: A curve mesh violating (a) and satisfying (b) the geometrical similarity.


Figure 2.30: Model and mesh of a chair.


Figure 2.31: Model and mesh of a mechanical joint.


Figure 2.32: Model and mesh of a junction of two pipes.


Figure 2.33: Model and mesh of a crankshaft.


Figure 2.34: Model and mesh of a notched beam.


Figure 2.35: Number of elements vs. time - uniform mesh of a chair.


Figure 2.36: Number of elements vs. time - graded mesh of a chair.


Figure 2.37: Number of elements vs. time - uniform mesh of a joint.


Figure 2.38: Number of elements vs. time - graded mesh of a joint.


Figure 2.39: Number of elements vs. time - uniform mesh of a junction.


Figure 2.40: Number of elements vs. time - uniform mesh of a crankshaft.


Figure 2.41: Number of elements vs. time - graded mesh of a beam.


Figure 2.42: Distribution of the element quality - mesh Chair-1.


Figure 2.43: Distribution of the element quality - mesh Chair-3.


Figure 2.44: Distribution of the element quality - mesh Chair-5.


Figure 2.45: Distribution of dihedral angles - mesh Chair-1.


Figure 2.46: Distribution of dihedral angles - mesh Chair-3.


Figure 2.47: Distribution of dihedral angles - mesh Chair-5.


Figure 2.48: Distribution of the element quality - mesh Joint-1.


Figure 2.49: Distribution of the element quality - mesh Joint-3.


Figure 2.50: Distribution of the element quality - mesh Joint-5.


Figure 2.51: Distribution of dihedral angles - mesh Joint-1.


Figure 2.52: Distribution of dihedral angles - mesh Joint-3.


Figure 2.53: Distribution of dihedral angles - mesh Joint-5.



Next: Tables Up: Sequential Mesh Generation Previous: Examples

Daniel Rypl
2005-12-07